What’s Belly Fat Got To Do With Food Sensitivities?

Wow, what a week. I did my very first webinar last Saturday, thank you very much to those who were there. I’m happy to say I didn’t muck up the technology! Here’s some of the feedback:

“Awesome info.”

“I have just listened to the webinar session, and I have to let you know it was absolutely FANTASTIC!!!  I have taken notes, and will put them into action.”

“It was really excellent! The subject matter and presentation. Also, loved the client stories. I think my sisters would be very interested to watch the recording, too.“

The webinar was specifically for smart women approaching 50 (shhh!) and the topic was, “How to Have Peace of Mind Around Food And Curb Your Cravings Without Depending On Willpower.” If it interests you at all to pick up some useful information that you can apply to your everyday which will make a difference, here’s the link to the webinar replay. I don’t know how long this replay will be up for, and this is the only time you’ll catch me on my very first webinar! Lol.

So, what have I been denying?

Well, one of the things I shared on the webinar was the idea of food sensitivities.

Food sensitivities are when your immune system has a response to the food you’re eating. It causes inflammation which can show up in numerous ways – a runny nose, puffy eyes, fatigue, bloating, general puffiness, foggy thinking, lack of concentration, lack of motivation, poor memory, itchy skin, eczema, a rumbly tummy… The trouble with food sensitivities is that they can be hard to track and because we often think that our symptoms are a “normal” part of life, that it’s just “something that one gets”, we don’t recognize that those symptoms could be the result of eating foods that don’t agree with us.

Inflammation is actually a healthy response from our immune system. We all know, for example, when we’ve sprained an ankle, and our ankle goes red, swells up, feels hot to the touch and is painful, that it’s a normal part of the healing process. It can also save our life. But the inflammation that comes from food sensitivities is often ongoing when we continue to eat those very foods that cause the inflammation in the first place. In other words, the inflammation becomes chronic. What’s more, it is often also at a low level, which enables us to either not notice it or ignore it.

Here’s the thing about inflammation. It can be what’s causing you to hold on to that excess weight. Who would have thought, right?

Simplifying it as much as possible, inflammation cause physiological stress in your body, which in turn causes your stress hormone, cortisol, to be elevated. This in turn raises your blood sugar levels, which then also raises the level of another hormone, insulin. It’s the interaction of these two hormones being chronically elevated that then causes your body to deposit fat around the middle and to hold on to it.

As this process continues and we pack more fat into the cells, the fat cells expand until they are “full up” and then, they themselves start to get inflamed, kicking off another cycle of inflammation.

And what is good for you to know is that there is increasing evidence that this kind of systemic inflammation plays a central role in other more serious conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

So, how can you reduce inflammation?

Here’s the long and short of it.

  1. Discover if you have any food sensitivities and remove those foods temporarily in order to help your digestive system to heal. A good way to do this is by following an elimination protocol. Here’s one resource – Tom Malterre’s book (and if you happen to consult it, I’d personally leave out Phase 1).
  2. Significantly reduce or remove inflammatory foods from your diet, such as refined sugar, foods cooked at a high temperature, processed meats, artificial trans-fats which can be found in hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, margarine, refined carbohydrates, excessive alcohol.
  3. Include as many anti-inflammatory foods in your meals as you can. These are foods that help your body to quell the fires of inflammation, such as green leafy vegetables, broccoli, coriander (cilantro), blueberries, turmeric, bone broth, foods that are rich in omega-3 fats like salmon, matcha tea.

Now that said, I really don’t like having to say, “Don’t eat this or that.” So, instead, I’m going to ask you to focus primarily on (3) and raise your awareness to be able to do (1). Then eat, eat and eat all the foods that are good for you – nutrient-dense, real, whole foods. You can start today, by upping your vegetable intake. Just add one or two more servings, or three! With some delicious butter!

There, that feels so very much better, doesn’t it? 😉

Make your next years your best years.